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Best Way To Learn Autodesk Fusion 360

Best way to learn Fusion 360

My hero, Tony Robbins said:
“You can only learn by connecting something unknown to something you already know.”

Trying to learn a new CAD/CAM software can be painful, especially if you have no idea where to find someone to connect the unknown to the known.

Now, there is a place for Fusion 360 users to close the gap between the unknown and known… The Getting Started Portal:
https://www.autodesk.com/products/fusion-360/get-started

I can still remember that Saturday afternoon in 2007. After hours of fighting, frustrated, confused and defeated, I drove to the book store and bought SolidWorks for Dummies…Man, did I feel dumb that day.

2007 was a long time ago, and yes, I still feel frustrated when learning new software. But luckily for you and me, when it comes to Fusion 360, the new Getting started With Fusion 360 takes the feeling dumb out of the picture.

Remember…
Remember, all you need is a good strategy to get a handle on Fusion 360. And, a strategy is nothing but a way to organize your resources. That is what this is.

What is it?
This is your Fusion 360 specialists, call them professors if you like, providing you with the best-structured learning site for Fusion 360.

Why use it?

One place of Fusion 360 learning content that will constantly be updated and expanded…bigger is better!

What can you gain?
You will for sure leave the Getting Started with Fusion 360 a lot more confident in your modeling skills…if not, beers on me.

How does it work?
It is easy; it is free. You simply click on the path that excites you the most. And, the distance from unknown to known just got a lot smaller.

Conclusion…
Yes, I think YouTube is great, but nothing replaces a structured learning path. This learning site has the resources you need in an organized fashion; a place you can start out, and come to for continued learning. Like I said, it is free…Check it out:
https://www.autodesk.com/products/fusion-360/get-started

Podcast Episode 11 – Quick CAD Tip, 7 Skills Needed to be a top engineer & CAD News


Listen to the Podcast!
Quick CAD Tip, 7 skills needed to be… & CAD News!
Show notes:
CAD Tip: Start your CAD Design the right way
7 Skills Needed to Be a Top Engineer
CAD Professional’s Guide to Lightning-Fast R&D
Lawsuit Against Stratasys Claims MakerBot Knew Of Faulty Smart Extruders, Misled Investors
MakerBot opened its new, 170,000-square-foot factory
Massive Investment in GM Arlington Assembly Plant
Delcam Appoints Charles Jones as Industry Marketing Manager
BobCAD-CAM Releases v28 CAD-CAM Series
Develop3D Summer magazine
What you need to know about upgrading to Windows 10
How Fast Can A Ferrari Go On Autobahn? This Video Has The Answer

Getting started with the 3D Printing Utility in Fusion 360

So much good stuff to be found in Autodesk’s standard Fusion 360. Check this video out! Link
On the fabrication side you have a pretty cool 3D Printing utility that talks with Autodesk’s Free MESHMIXER.
Download Autodesk MESHMIXER

Manufacturing is taking 3D Printing to the next level

3DPrinter Manaufacturing
3D printing has been around for a long time, but not until recently has this technology reached a level where traditional manufacturing facilities are taking it seriously.

The process called “Additive Manufacturing” builds layer by layer and has been seen only as a pure prototyping process until recently. With new materials, better accuracy, various sized platforms and reasonable pricing, it has come to a point where everyone can participate.
We are not talking about the hobbyist level, though we probably have to thank them for helping push the technology.  They are also, unfortunately, the ones who created a false impression that this is merely a fancy hot glue gun that makes toys.

Autodesk 3D PrintingOn the other end of the spectrum, you have Autodesk announcing that they are investing $100 million in 3D Printing companies over the next several years. They are also developing their own 3D Printer and 3D Printer software which is open source for everyone to tinker with. (More to come in another blog post about this.)





But what about manufacturing…
Yes: what about manufacturing? Is it just prototyping and a lot of hype? The answer is no, and actually, in a way, you might see “Good old American” manufacturing waking up to glory. This is just the beginning and it is super exciting because as consumers are being more demanding, designers and engineers are looking at manufacturing for help.
Here is an example:
A company is looking for a lot of 100 molded plastic parts. Traditionally you might decide that an aluminum mold would be preferred. The cost of material is not going to set you back too much, and it should hit your doorstep within a few days if you live in United States.
3D Print Mold
If you are productive, you might have spent those couple days gathering your tooling, and even started the process of programming the job in your favorite CAM program. You could, of course, also have chosen to use a 3D Printer, and have what you see in the picture above for less than $500, before the chunk of raw aluminum even gets delivered. This takes what traditional manufacturing might consider a 5 to 7 day turnaround down to 2 days, letting you keep your CNC machine cranking real parts, thus giving you an extra 3 to 5 days to work on a new project or, if you’re lucky, to work on your back-swing.

It is getting local…
This is really what excites me: you do not need to travel to some showroom or university to see this in action; local machine shops already have this technology.
One example is Staub Inc., located less than 20 minutes from me in the outskirts of “blue collar” Buffalo, New York. Mr. Tony Staub started as many manufacturing facilities around the country did: in a garage. And when he outgrew that, he moved into a Super Duper grocery store location. Over the last 20 years, Staub Inc. has built a high precision machine shop using the latest technology within traditional CNC machining. Adding an Additive Department is not about looking far into the future.  It is about offering the latest technology to existing and new customers, while finding use for, and exploring, this great resource.

Conclusion…
Manufacturing is taking 3D Printing inside the shop, and I guarantee you, my friend, THERE is where 3D Printing will reveal its true potential.  I love it!

6 things SolidWorks Users should know about 3D Printing

What do you want to know about 3D Printing?

My experience is that engineers and designers want to know everything about everything.

We just don’t always have that kind of time so we have to simplify.
The Trick…
My trick when I need to learn the basics of anything is 1st off to find any kind of expert and ask 2 questions and receive 6 useful answers.

  1. Tell me 3 things that I should absolutely know.
  2. Tell me the 3 biggest mistake other people make.

With these 6 answers printed on a yellow sticker on your monitor you can fairly safe adventure into new challenges :-)

3D Printing…
I do not know much about 3D Printing so I went to my friend Lee McElhinny and asked the following 2 questions, and was lucky enough to end up with 6 good useful answers.

Question…
3 Things a designer should know about 3D Printing.

Lee’s Answer…
3d printing is VERY different from Machining

1) Support removal must be taken into consideration with fragile parts or fragile features on parts.

2) 3D printing can build complicated blind holes and undercuts that machining cannot.

3) With soluble support material, entire functioning assemblies can be built as one piece with no post assembly required.

Question…
3 Mistakes a SolidWorks User does on a design that need to be printed.

Lee’s Answer…
1) When scaling a large model down to be printed (I.E. a building or a car) a small features size are sometimes reduced to the point that they don’t build ( antennas and flagpoles for example).

2) Adjacent parts are sometimes not merged when they need to be resulting in the model being built as two parts (or one very fragile part) when the intent was to build one strong part.

3) A part is sometimes designed for machining (I.E. two joining parts ) when they can be built as one in 3D Print.

Thank you Lee…

Conclusion…
I believe in many ways 3D Printing is going through the same development the CNC Mill did through the 90’s and into the 2000’s. As the machines gets better the engineers and designers will feed them more challenging projects. These 6 answers from Lee should be a good starting point.